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What is NFC Technology?

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Near Field Communication (NFC) technology makes life easier and more convenient for consumers around the world by making it simpler to make transactions, exchange digital content, and connect electronic devices with a touch. buying a ticket with an NFC-enabled mobile phone A standards-based connectivity technology, NFC harmonizes today's diverse contactless technologies, enabling current and future solutions in areas such as: Access control Consumer electronics Healthcare Information collection and exchange Loyalty and coupons Payments Transport Developers can learn more about NFC in the section on interoperability. Key Benefits of NFC NFC provides a range of benefits to consumers and businesses, such as: Intuitive: NFC interactions require no more than a simple touch Versatile: NFC is ideally suited to the broadest range of industries, environments, and uses Open and standards-based: The underlying layers of NFC technology follow universally implemented ISO, ECMA, and ETSI standards Technology-enabling: NFC facilitates fast and simple setup of wireless technologies, such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, etc.) Inherently secure: NFC transmissions are short range (from a touch to a few centimeters) Interoperable: NFC works with existing contactless card technologies Security-ready: NFC has built-in capabilities to support secure applications
Posted: 05-07-2012 @ 11:53:37
NEAR FIELD COMMUNICATION U CAN SEND DATA JUST BY TAPPING TWO NFC ENABLED MOBILES LIKE NOKIA 603
Posted: 02-07-2012 @ 22:00:33
The Near Field Communication Forum (http://www.nfc-forum.org/home) was set up in 2004. It is an industrial no profit association with the aim to standardize, implement and promote the NFC technology. Today the Forum has more then 160 members and is made up of manufacturing firms of developers and financial institutes. In august 2006 it issued the first four official specifications that relate to four initial format tags. From the technical point of view NFC technology is an extension of ISO 1443 (which defines the standard of RFID tag Mifare at 13,56 Mhz) and both of ECMA and ETSI standard, it combines the integration of one smart card with one device or terminal. All NFC devices allow the reading and writing of information of high speed (424 Kbis/s). NFC connection happens when, so to say, they make a wireless connection which is compatible with Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. Since the way of function is highly limited it guarantees safe communication avoiding “sniffing” data. One NFC device can communicate either with already present readers and cards ISO 1443 as well as with other NFC devices. So it is already compatible with the existing infrastructures RFID for payments and public transport. The NFC integration into cell phones and multimedia readers is already being tested, as the iPod can be, which enables buying and transferring of multimedia material. The first concrete case of investments and NFC applications is delivered by Nokia, the leader firm for the communication in mobility products. Nokia has trusted in NFC technology from the very beginning. On the 22 last April, at the opening WIMA (www.wima-nfc.com) – the annual conference on commercial possibilities and NFC technology development held in Monaco– Nokia presented its third mobile cell phone with NFC technology completely integrated into Nokia 6216 classic. For the first time such a technology was integrated into the SIM card allowing the cell phone operators to insert NFC services directly into the card itself. Thanks to such a technology costumers will be able to exchange between themselves the contents like pictures, files and data, in a more simple and comfortable way. Besides, NFC technology introduces payments and RFID transactions- all these with a simple touch of cell phone.
Posted: 11-11-2011 @ 14:18:01
The full form of NFC is Near Field Communication & this technology allows chips inside your credit card to communicate within the terminal to process your payment.The NFC tag within your credit card is turned off until it is within close range of a payment terminal. With smartphones getting better and better as time passes on, you will find that NFC technology can either act as the transmitter or as the receiver.
Posted: 10-11-2011 @ 11:51:20
In the recent years new standards referring to RFID technology are imposed and among them surely the NFC is important. It is the technology with the radio frequency which allows communication between two devices that are near. They allow the exchange of information or performance of security payment. The designers claim that NFC will simplify to its extreme the way of interaction between the consumers device and guarantee a fast and secure information exchange. Possible applications are many folded: Paying by mobile devices like cell phones Credit card integration into a mobile device Electronic money integrating with prepaid cards Electronic ticketing for transport usage Personal electronic document Download of data from kiosks such as railway time table Flight and hotel booking Music and photos download from camera, cell phones, multimedia readers Connections P2P (peer to peer) for an easy information transmission between wireless devices
Posted: 08-11-2011 @ 18:39:39
Near field communication, or NFC, allows for simplified transactions, data exchange, and wireless connections between two devices in close proximity to each other, usually by no more than a few centimeters. It is expected to become a widely used system for making payments by smartphone in the United States. Many smartphones currently on the market already contain embedded NFC chips that can send encrypted data a short distance ("near field") to a reader located, for instance, next to a retail cash register. Shoppers who have their credit card information stored in their NFC smartphones can pay for purchases by waving their smartphones near or tapping them on the reader, rather than using the actual credit card. Co-invented by NXP Semiconductors and Sony in 2002, NFC technology is being added to a growing number of mobile handsets to enable mobile payments, as well as many other applications.
Posted: 08-11-2011 @ 18:37:06
NFC, or near-field communications, defines the way two products communicate with each other. NFC is short range wireless RFID technology (1-4cm, 10cm theoretical) which uses Low Speeds (106-414 kbps) and a Low Friction Setup (No discovery and no pairing), which allows two devices to automatically start communicating when they are close to one another. NFC uses Passive Targets (with no batteries!) and Random devices that are not powered (tags aka stickers). NFC Tags are essentially “targets” to touch NFC devices to (like mobile phones). These targets can contain information or automatically point you to information, applications or services. Purchasing criteria for these seemingly simple little tags can actually be quite complex. Factors include tag type (i.e what standard or proprietary modulation scheme the tag follows), memory size, level of security (e.g. ability to lock the tag after it is written to). Google is developing application tools to allow application programmers to write programs that utilize NFC. Googles Android Phone supports NFC. Google's platform is called “Gingerbread.” They offer APIs to developers to allow for: Tag Read, Tag Write and Peer to Peer communications. Basically just touch to exchange data…And more! The new software platform is called Ice Cream Sandwich.
Posted: 04-11-2011 @ 13:44:28
From the technical point of view NFC technology is an extension of ISO 1443 (which defines the standard of RFID tag Mifare at 13,56 Mhz) and both of ECMA and ETSI standard, it combines the integration of one smart card with one device or terminal. All NFC devices allow the reading and writing of information of high speed (424 Kbis/s). NFC connection happens when, so to say, they make a wireless connection which is compatible with Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. Since the way of function is highly limited it guarantees safe communication avoiding “sniffing” data. One NFC device can communicate either with already present readers and cards ISO 1443 as well as with other NFC devices. So it is already compatible with the existing infrastructures RFID for payments and public transport. The NFC integration into cell phones and multimedia readers is already being tested, as the iPod can be, which enables buying and transferring of multimedia material. The first concrete case of investments and NFC applications is delivered by Nokia, the leader firm for the communication in mobility products. Nokia has trusted in NFC technology from the very beginning. On the 22 last April, at the opening WIMA (www.wima-nfc.com) – the annual conference on commercial possibilities and NFC technology development held in Monaco– Nokia presented its third mobile cell phone with NFC technology completely integrated into Nokia 6216 classic. For the first time such a technology was integrated into the SIM card allowing the cell phone operators to insert NFC services directly into the card itself. Thanks to such a technology costumers will be able to exchange between themselves the contents like pictures, files and data, in a more simple and comfortable way. Besides, NFC technology introduces payments and RFID transactions- all these with a simple touch of cell phone. For example, the users’ credit card information may be safely kept on SIM card and it will be only enough to pass over the mobile device with the users’ hand in front of RFID terminal in order to access quickly to paying and other simple ticketing services. Commercializing of Nokia 6216 classic is meant for the last quarter of this year on selected markets including Italy with the selling price of € 150. Taxes and subventions are excluded. In the last edition of Cartes in Paris (www.cartes.com) – the Fair related to the card technology and the payment systems- the NFC adhesives were presented on that occasion and will be available on markets from 2009. The adhesive is meant for the phones markets to promote massive usage of technology. The adhesive has an antenna, RFID chip and a ferrite layer to protect it from electromagnetic fields. To be able use the NFC it is enough to stick the adhesive onto the cell phone battery. A market research done by the Internet has shown that two or three interviewed persons would prefer paying directly by cell phone to carrying a wallet or coin purse with themselves. Apart from this, a paying through RFID technology is more practical then by cards- which you have to scrape or they have a little visible chip- simply to say, they often make confusion at paying.
Posted: 03-11-2011 @ 10:59:41
Near field communication, or NFC, allows for simplified transactions, data exchange, and wireless connections between two devices in close proximity to each other, usually by no more than a few centimeters. It is expected to become a widely used system for making payments by smartphone in the United States. Many smartphones currently on the market already contain embedded NFC chips that can send encrypted data a short distance ("near field") to a reader located, for instance, next to a retail cash register. Shoppers who have their credit card information stored in their NFC smartphones can pay for purchases by waving their smartphones near or tapping them on the reader, rather than using the actual credit card. Co-invented by NXP Semiconductors and Sony in 2002, NFC technology is being added to a growing number of mobile handsets to enable mobile payments, as well as many other applications. The Near Field Communication Forum (NFC Forum) formed in 2004 promotes sharing, pairing, and transactions between NFC devices and develops and certifies device compliance with NFC standards. A smartphone or tablet with an NFC chip could make a credit card payment or serve as keycard or ID card. NFC devices can read NFC tags on a museum or retail display to get more information or an audio or video presentation. NFC can share a contact, photo, song, application, or video or pair Bluetooth devices. NFC and Bluetooth are both short-range communication technologies which are integrated into mobile phones. As described in technical detail below, NFC operates at slower speeds than Bluetooth, but consumes far less power and doesn’t require pairing. NFC sets up faster than standard Bluetooth, but is not faster than Bluetooth low energy. With NFC, instead of performing manual configurations to identify devices, the connection between two NFC devices is automatically established quickly: in less than a tenth of a second. The maximum data transfer rate of NFC (424 kbit/s) is slower than that of Bluetooth V2.1 (2.1 Mbit/s). With a maximum working distance of less than 20 cm, NFC has a shorter range, which reduces the likelihood of unwanted interception. That makes NFC particularly suitable for crowded areas where correlating a signal with its transmitting physical device (and by extension, its user) becomes difficult. NFC-enabled handsets Nokia 603 Nokia 600 Nokia 700 Nokia 701 Nokia N9[42][43][44] Nokia C7-00[45] and the Nokia Astound and Nokia Oro variants, with the NFC feature enabled starting with the Symbian Anna release of the OS. Nokia 6216 Classic[46] (Nokia has confirmed the cancellation of this phone in February 2010)[47] Nokia 6212 Classic[48] Nokia 6131 NFC[49] Nokia 3220 + NFC Shell[50] Nokia 5140(i) + NFC Shell[51] Samsung S5230 Tocco Lite/Star/Player One/Avila[52] Samsung SGH-X700 NFC[53] Samsung D500E[50] SAGEM my700X Contactless[49] LG 600V contactless[49] Motorola L7 (SLVR)[50] Benq T80[50] Sagem Cosyphone[54] Google Nexus S[55] Google Nexus S 4G[56] Samsung Galaxy S II (Some versions but not all)[57] Samsung Wave 578 BlackBerry Bold 9900/9930 Turkcell T20 BlackBerry Torch 9810/9860[58][59] Blackberry Curve 9350/9360/9370 Galaxy Nexus[60] HTC Amaze 4g
Posted: 29-10-2011 @ 19:28:49
The first thing to know is that NFC is actually not new tech. It's an evolution of the radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology, which has been used for years as the basis for the London Underground's Oyster cards, where you simply tap your Oyster card on a pad to pay for your journey. NFC extends the capabilities of RFID, though it's still compatible with the older technology, and should be able to do more than just take payments. NFC's development is overseen to a degree by the NFC Forum, which publishes specifications and has developed a certification scheme for ensuring that different NFC devices work with one another.
Posted: 25-10-2011 @ 13:42:24
Whenever we take out credit card and tap on a reader to pay at a store, the technology being used it called Near Field Communications (NFC). This technology allows a chip inside your credit card to communicate within the terminal to process your payment. With that said, over the past few years we have begun seeing practically every credit card on the market has become a “tap & pay” system. All you have to do is tap your credit card on the payment terminal, and you can be on your way. What is the future of NFC? The NFC tag within your credit card is turned off until it is within close range of a payment terminal. With smartphones getting better and better as time passes on, you will find that NFC technology can either act as the transmitter or as the receiver. With that in mind, you will find people being able to tap to transfer pictures, contact info, etc What interests me the most is the fact that smartphones can become a housing for your credit cards. Essentially, you can activate your credit card on your smartphone, and then “tap & pay”. Google has recently unveiled the Google Wallet, a digital wallet, making full use of what NFC technology offers. The Google Wallet allows people to take their smartphone and make purchases with it with the credit card information stored on it. Some people can also store loyalty card information on it, allowing them to leave those cards out of their wallet. As you can see below, the Google Wallet is being used at a register to cash out. I for one cannot wait when this service is available in Canada. It will be so easy to pay for items when you just have to take your phone and put it near an NFC terminal.
Posted: 23-10-2011 @ 21:22:08
Near field communication, or NFC, allows for simplified transactions, data exchange, and wireless connections between two devices in close proximity to each other, usually by no more than a few centimeters. It is expected to become a widely used system for making payments by smartphone in the United States. Many smartphones currently on the market already contain embedded NFC chips that can send encrypted data a short distance ("near field") to a reader located, for instance, next to a retail cash register. Shoppers who have their credit card information stored in their NFC smartphones can pay for purchases by waving their smartphones near or tapping them on the reader, rather than using the actual credit card. Co-invented by NXP Semiconductors and Sony in 2002, NFC technology is being added to a growing number of mobile handsets to enable mobile payments, as well as many other applications. The Near Field Communication Forum (NFC Forum) formed in 2004 promotes sharing, pairing, and transactions between NFC devices and develops and certifies device compliance with NFC standards.A smartphone or tablet with an NFC chip could make a credit card payment or serve as keycard or ID card. NFC devices can read NFC tags on a museum or retail display to get more information or an audio or video presentation. NFC can share a contact, photo, song, application, or video or pair Bluetooth devices. NFC simplifies and expands social networking options: *File Sharing: Tap one NFC device to another to instantly share a contact, photo, song, application, video, or website link. *Electronic business card: Tap one NFC device to another to instantly share electronic business cards or resumes. *Electronic money: To pay a friend, you could tap the devices and enter the amount of the payment. *Mobile gaming: Tap one NFC device to another to enter a multiplayer game. *Friend-to-friend: You could touch NFC devices together to Facebook friend each other or share a resume or to "check-in" at a location. NFC is a set of short-range wireless technologies, typically requiring a distance of 4 cm or less. NFC operates at 13.56 MHz on ISO/IEC 18000-3 air interface and at rates ranging from 106 kbit/s to 424 kbit/s. NFC always involves an initiator and a target; the initiator actively generates an RF field that can power a passive target. This enables NFC targets to take very simple form factors such as tags, stickers, key fobs, or cards that do not require batteries. NFC peer-to-peer communication is of course possible, where both devices are powered.[3] A patent licensing program for NFC is currently under development by Via Licensing Corporation, an independent subsidiary of Dolby Laboratories. A public, platform-independent NFC library is released under the free GNU Lesser General Public License by the name libnfc.[27] NFC tags contain data and are typically read-only but may be rewriteable. They can be custom-encoded by their manufacturers or use the specifications provided by the NFC Forum, an industry association charged with promoting the technology and setting key standards. The tags can securely store personal data such as debit and credit card information, loyalty program data, PINs and networking contacts, among other information. The NFC Forum defines four types of tags which provide different communication speeds and capabilities in terms of configurability, memory, security, data retention and write endurance. Tags currently offer between 96 and 512 bytes of memory. As with proximity card technology, near-field communication uses magnetic induction between two loop antennas located within each other's near field, effectively forming an air-core transformer. It operates within the globally available and unlicensed radio frequency ISM band of 13.56 MHz. Most of the RF energy is concentrated in the allowed 14 kHz bandwidth range, but the full spectral envelope may be as wide as 1.8 MHz when using ASK modulation.[28] Theoretical working distance with compact standard antennas: up to 20 cm (practical working distance of about 4 centimetres) Supported data rates: 106, 212 or 424 kbit/s (the bit rate 848 kbit/s is not compliant with the standard ISO/IEC 18092) There are two modes: Passive communication mode: The initiator device provides a carrier fields and the target device answers by modulating the existing field. In this mode, the target device may draw its operating power from the initiator-provided electromagnetic field, thus making the target device a transponder. Active communication mode: Both initiator and target device communicate by alternately generating their own fields. A device deactivates its RF field while it is waiting for data. In this mode, both devices typically have power supplies. :::::::::::::::::: NFC-enabled handsets Nokia 603 Nokia 600 Nokia 700 Nokia 701 Nokia N9[42][43][44] Nokia C7-00[45] and the Nokia Astound and Nokia Oro variants, with the NFC feature enabled starting with the Symbian Anna release of the OS. Nokia 6216 Classic[46] (Nokia has confirmed the cancellation of this phone in February 2010)[47] Nokia 6212 Classic[48] Nokia 6131 NFC[49] Nokia 3220 + NFC Shell[50] Nokia 5140(i) + NFC Shell[51] Samsung S5230 Tocco Lite/Star/Player One/Avila[52] Samsung SGH-X700 NFC[53] Samsung D500E[50] SAGEM my700X Contactless[49] LG 600V contactless[49] Motorola L7 (SLVR)[50] Benq T80[50] Sagem Cosyphone[54] Google Nexus S[55] Google Nexus IKC[56] Samsung Galaxy S II (Some versions but not all)[57] Samsung Wave 578 BlackBerry Bold 9900/9930 Turkcell T20 BlackBerry Torch 9810/9860[58][59] Blackberry Curve 9350/9360/9370 Galaxy Nexus[60]
Posted: 22-10-2011 @ 19:47:17
NFC stands for Near Field Communication. Its a technology between bluetooth and infrared which allows simple transactions and transfer secure information by touching devices.
Posted: 14-10-2011 @ 02:18:07
Near field communication, or NFC, allows for simplified transactions, data exchange, and wireless connections between two devices in close proximity to each other, usually by no more than a few centimeters.Whenever we take out credit card and tap on a reader to pay at a store, the technology being used it called Near Field Communications (NFC). This technology allows a chip inside your credit card to communicate within the terminal to process your payment.
Posted: 13-10-2011 @ 21:51:23
Near field communication , or NFC , allows for simplified transactions, data exchange,and wireless connections between two devices in closeproximity to each other, usually by no more than a few centimeters.NFC is a set of short-range wireless technologies, typically requiring a distance of 4 cm or less. NFC operatesat 13.56 MHz on ISO/IEC 18000-3 air interface and at rates ranging from 106 kbit/sto 424 kbit/s.near-field communication uses magnetic induction between two loop antennas located within each other's near field , effectively forming anair-core transformer . It operates within the globallyavailable and unlicensed radio frequency ISM band of13.56 MHz. Most of the RF energy is concentrated in the allowed 14 kHz bandwidth range, but the full spectral envelope may be as wide as 1.8 MHz when using ASK modulation.
Posted: 13-10-2011 @ 19:52:52
NFC means Near field communication it allows for simplified transactions, data exchange, and wireless connections between two devices in close distance it means in centimeters range.......
Posted: 13-10-2011 @ 16:53:52
Near-field Communications (NFC) is a short-range high frequency wireless communication technology commonly used in contactless cards, mobile phones and passive RFID.
Posted: 13-10-2011 @ 15:42:42