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What is WEP?

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Wired Equivalent Privacy, a deprecated wireless network security standard. Sometimes erroneously called "Wireless Encryption Protocol. Definition: WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) is a security protocol for wireless networks. It was introduced as part of the original 802.11 wireless protocol in 1997 and intended to match the security level of wired networks. We know today that WEP is not a very secure protocol, easily cracked by software within minutes. It has since been replaced by stronger wireless encryption protocols, WPA and WPA2. Unfortunately, WEP is still being used on some wireless networks, likely creating a false sense of security.
Posted: 10-04-2012 @ 12:18:38
WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) is a security protocol for wireless networks. It was introduced as part of the original 802.11 wireless protocol in 1997 and intended to match the security level of wired networks. We know today that WEP is not a very secure protocol, easily cracked by software within minutes. It has since been replaced by stronger wireless encryption protocols, WPA and WPA2. Unfortunately, WEP is still being used on some wireless networks, likely creating a false sense of security.
Posted: 09-04-2012 @ 13:34:52
WEP stands for Wired Equivalent Privacy, a standard for WiFi wireless network security. A WEP key is a security code used on some Wi-Fi networks. WEP keys allow a group of devices on a local network (such as a home network) to exchange encoded messages with each other while hiding the contents of the messages from easy viewing by outsiders. Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a security protocol for wireless networks that encrypts transmitted data . It's easy to configure. Without any security your data can be intercepted without difficulty. Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a broken security algorithm for IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. Introduced as part of the original 802.11 standard ratified in September 1999, its intention is to provide data confidentiality comparable to that of a traditional wired network.
Posted: 13-10-2011 @ 22:16:01
Security researchers have discovered security problems that let malicious users compromise the security of WLANs (wireless local area network) that use WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy). The biggest problem with WEP is when the installer doesn't enable it in the first place. Even bad security is generally better than no security. When people do use WEP, they forget to change their keys periodically. Having many clients in a wireless network — potentially sharing the identical key for long periods of time — is a well-known security vulnerability. If you keep your key long enough, someone can grab all the frames he needs to crack it. Can't blame most access-point administrators for not changing keys — after all, the WEP protocol doesn't offer any key management provisions. But the situation is dangerous: When someone in your organization loses a laptop for any reason, the key could become compromised — along with all the other computers sharing the key. So it's worth repeating . . .
Posted: 12-10-2011 @ 15:22:32
Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a security protocol for wireless networks that encrypts transmitted data . It's easy to configure. Without any security your data can be intercepted without difficulty. Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a weak security algorithm for IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. Introduced as part of the original 802.11 standard ratified in September 1999, its intention was to provide data confidentiality comparable to that of a traditional wired network.[1] WEP, recognizable by the key of 10 or 26 hexadecimal digits, is widely in use and is often the first security choice presented to users by router configuration tools
Posted: 12-10-2011 @ 14:26:30
Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a broken security algorithm for IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. Introduced as part of the original 802.11 standard ratified in September 1999, its intention is to provide data confidentiality comparable to that of a traditional wired network.
Posted: 25-08-2011 @ 17:08:07
WEP(Wired Equivalent Privacy) is a protocol that adds security to wireless local area networks (WLANs) based on the 802.11 Wi-Fi standard. WEP is an OSI Data Link layer (Layer 2) security technology that can be turned "on" or "off." WEP was designed to give wireless networks the equivalent level of privacy protection as a comparable wired networ
Posted: 28-07-2011 @ 17:16:54
Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a deprecated security algorithm for IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. Wireless transmission is susceptible to eavesdropping and, so, WEP was introduced as part of the original 802.11 protocol in 1997
Posted: 25-07-2011 @ 11:55:58
Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a security protocol for wireless networks that encrypts transmitted data . It's easy to configure. Without any security your data can be intercepted without difficulty. However, WEP was an early attempt to secure wireless networks, and better security is now available such as DES, VPN, and WPA. See the Guide to Internet Security to learn about network security. WEP has three settings: Off (no security), 64-bit (weak security), 128-bit (a bit better security). WEP is not difficult to crack, and using it reduces performance slightly. If you run a network with only the default security, where WEP is turned off, any of your neighbors can immediately log on to your network and use your Internet connection. For wireless devices to communicate, all of them must use the same WEP setting. (40-bit and 64-bit WEP encryption are the same thing — 40-bit devices can communicate with 64-bit devices.) While there is no extra performance cost to encrypting the longer key, there is a cost to transmitting the extra data over the network. 128-bit security is not much more difficult than 64-bit to crack, so if you are concerned about performance, consider using 64-bit. If you're very concerned about security, use WPA, which replaces WEP with a protocol that is — given current technology — impossible to crack. There's a good overview in What's New in Security: WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access). The WEP concept of passphrase is introduced so that you do not have to enter complicated strings for keys by hand. The passphrase you enter is converted into complicated keys. Choose passphrases with the same care you would important passwords. With 128-bit encryption, you need to enter a passphrase to generate each key. All four keys must be specified, because WEP switches between them to make your traffic more difficult to break. All devices within your LAN must use the same passphrases (i.e., the same keys). WEP is not necessary if you have a gaming console such as PlayStation or Xbox, and there are no other computers on the network.
Posted: 21-07-2011 @ 15:16:59
wired equivalent privacy(wep) is a security protocol for wireless networks that encrypts transmitted data.it's easy to configure.without any security your data can be intercepted without difficulty.
Posted: 18-07-2011 @ 22:11:15
Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a broken security algorithm for IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. Introduced as part of the original 802.11 standard ratified in September 1999, its intention is to provide data confidentiality comparable to that of a traditional wired network.
Posted: 18-07-2011 @ 20:51:59
Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a security protocol for wireless networks that encrypts transmitted data . It's easy to configure. Without any security your data can be intercepted without difficulty. However, WEP was an early attempt to secure wireless networks, and better security is now available such as DES, VPN, and WPA. See the Guide to Internet Security to learn about network security. WEP has three settings: Off (no security), 64-bit (weak security), 128-bit (a bit better security). WEP is not difficult to crack, and using it reduces performance slightly. If you run a network with only the default security, where WEP is turned off, any of your neighbors can immediately log on to your network and use your Internet connection. For wireless devices to communicate, all of them must use the same WEP setting. (40-bit and 64-bit WEP encryption are the same thing — 40-bit devices can communicate with 64-bit devices.) While there is no extra performance cost to encrypting the longer key, there is a cost to transmitting the extra data over the network. 128-bit security is not much more difficult than 64-bit to crack, so if you are concerned about performance, consider using 64-bit. If you're very concerned about security, use WPA, which replaces WEP with a protocol that is — given current technology — impossible to crack. There's a good overview in What's New in Security: WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access). The WEP concept of passphrase is introduced so that you do not have to enter complicated strings for keys by hand. The passphrase you enter is converted into complicated keys. Choose passphrases with the same care you would important passwords. With 128-bit encryption, you need to enter a passphrase to generate each key. All four keys must be specified, because WEP switches between them to make your traffic more difficult to break. All devices within your LAN must use the same passphrases (i.e., the same keys). WEP is not necessary if you have a gaming console such as PlayStation or Xbox, and there are no other computers on the network.
Posted: 18-07-2011 @ 15:05:02