Talk Time

News and General

Can any one tell me What is a cyber crime??

Ask a Question Post a Comment
Post a Comment
Users
Answers (15)



MaxxSpy gives you the ability to remotely record all phone calls made to and from the monitored phone. With MaxxSpy, you can: Instantly see a recording of all incoming or outgoing calls. Record calls that are made to and from specific numbers only. All call recordings are uploaded to your online MaxxSpy control panel which you can access from anywhere with an internet connection. Listen to the recording either directly from you Control Panel or download them to your PC..
Posted: 01-01-2015 @ 20:40:17
What People Searched More on Google : Iphone6 or ISIS?
Posted: 15-09-2014 @ 13:42:06
Cyber crime means the crime committed on internet with the use of computer. Computer can be used as a tool or target for this purpose. Example of computer as a tool is when the some person is the main target of Cybercrime, the computer can be considered as the tool rather than the target i.e getting details of the person and hurt him/ her physically or psycologically eg theft,rape etc. Computer as a target is used for the purpose for hacking the data or important websites of government/ entities..
Posted: 13-09-2014 @ 20:39:29
Cyber Crime Is A Crime Which You Done On Internet Visit -> http://asksourabh.com For Latest News About Mobiles , Mobiles Reviews , Technology , Tips & Tricks etc.
Posted: 29-08-2014 @ 13:50:07
Cyber crime encompasses any criminal act dealing with computers and networks (called hacking). Additionally, cyber crime also includes traditional crimes conducted through the Internet. For example; hate crimes, telemarketing and Internet fraud, identity theft, and credit card account thefts are considered to be cyber crimes when the illegal activities are committed through the use of a computer and the Internet. http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/C/cyber_crime.html
Posted: 29-08-2014 @ 12:56:36
Parents, teachers, non-profits, government, and industry have been working hard to protect kids online. However, we also need to think about protecting the Internet from kids who might abuse it. The Department of Justice categorizes computer crime in three ways: The computer as a target - attacking the computers of others (spreading viruses is an example). The computer as a weapon - using a computer to commit "traditional crime" that we see in the physical world (such as fraud or illegal gambling). The computer as an accessory - using a computer as a "fancy filing cabinet" to store illegal or stolen information. Reports of alleged computer crime have been a hot news item of late. Especially alarming is the realization that many of the masterminds behind these criminal acts are mere kids. In fact, children no longer need to be highly skilled in order to execute cyber crimes. "Hacker tools" are easily available on the Net and, once downloaded, can be used by even novice computer users. This greatly expands the population of possible wrongdoers. Children (and in some cases - their parents) often think that shutting down or defacing Web sites or releasing network viruses are amusing pranks. Kids might not even realize that what they are doing is illegal. Still other kids might find themselves hanging out online with skilled hackers who share hacking tools with them and encourage them to do inappropriate things online. Unfortunately, some of these kids don't realize that they are committing crimes until it is too late. Even more distressing and difficult to combat is the fact that some in the media portray the computer criminal as a modern day Robin Hood. Nothing could be further from the truth.
Posted: 29-08-2014 @ 10:17:01
cybercrime is cheating online using fraudalent activity like hacking other information and sending spam emails like you won some crores of money and asking them to deposit some money to get crores of money so its always important for banking and other important information to use their banking website and dont share password with anyone even to your friend :)
Posted: 25-02-2014 @ 13:00:44
Computer crime encompasses a broad range of activities. Generally, however, it may be divided into two categories: (1) crimes that target computers directly; (2) crimes facilitated by computer networks or devices, the primary target of which is independent of the computer network or device. [ citation needed] Crimes that primarily target computer networks or devices include: Computer viruses Denial-of-service attacks Malware (malicious code) Crimes that use computer networks or devices to advance other ends include: Cyberstalking Fraud and identity theft Information warfare Phishing scams
Posted: 01-02-2014 @ 20:50:19
i will try to explain you briefly as long answers requires a lot of time and while reading such long answers we get bored. Lets now come to your question, in day to day life many crimes are commites theft, robbery, etc. In cyber world the same kind of crimes are commited in diffrent ways. for eg a bank will ask you to fill your account no and pin and will drive away and empty all of your account, someone may try to meet you and when you meet them they will kidnapp or theft you. cyber crimes are usually not very active as normal crimes but they are becoming active as the use of internet is being incraesed by the people. Thanks and have a nice day!!!!! Cheeers!!!1
Posted: 29-01-2014 @ 15:27:03
cyber crime means haker are illegally haking gmail account and useful details from our computer and damaging our security .
Posted: 20-01-2014 @ 15:31:11
all that crime then done by helping by internet that all crime known as cyber crime ! ex. haking e-mail , haking bank account , etc...
Posted: 07-01-2014 @ 19:46:15
Cybercrime is a term for any illegal activity that uses a computer as its primary means of commission. The U.S. Department of Justice expands the definition of cybercrime to include any illegal activity that uses a computer for the storage of evidence. The growing list of cybercrimes includes crimes that have been made possible by computers, such as network intrusions and the dissemination of computer viruses, as well as computer-based variations of existing crimes, such as identity theft, stalking, bullying and terrorism. There are a number of controversial issues surrounding cybercrime. Opinions differ, for example, as to whether some widespread activities (such as file sharing) should be classified as criminal acts. The U.S. Digital Media Copyright Act (DMCA) of 1998 stipulates that exchanging files of copyrighted material, such as music or videos, is illegal and punishable by law. In August, 2002, the U.S. Department of Justice announced that they would begin to prosecute cases of peer-to-peer piracy. Since that time, there have been sporadic suits brought against individuals. Such prosecutions please many in the entertainment industries but are less popular with the general public. Gary Shapiro, president of the Consumer Electronics Association, has remarked that "If we have 70 million people in the United States who are breaking the law, we have a big issue." Another controversy related to cybercrime is the issue of digital surveillance and its impact on civil liberties. Since the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in September 2001, many have deemed it necessary to curtail some individual rights to privacy of information in exchange for greater security. According to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), government surveillance networks monitor enormous volumes of private communications and apply artificial intelligence (AI) applications to filter out relevant data. Although such extensive surveillance might significantly decrease the possibility of cybercrime, it is nearly impossible to do so without infringing upon individual privacy. Furthermore, because surveillance organizations operate in secret, they are not open to scrutiny. The ACLU suggests that while surveillance can be effectively used to curtail cybercrime, it must be properly overseen to ensure that it is not at the cost of individual rights. RELATED GLOSSARY TERMS: RSA algorithm (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman), data key, greynet (or graynet), spam cocktail (or anti-spam cocktail), fingerscanning (fingerprint scanning), munging, insider threat, authentication server, defense in depth, nonrepudiation
Posted: 25-12-2013 @ 11:47:16
Like traditional crime, cybercrime can take many shapes and can occur nearly anytime or anyplace. Criminals committing cybercrime use a number of methods, depending on their skill-set and their goal. This should not be surprising: cybercrime is, after all, simply 'crime' with some sort of 'computer' or 'cyber' aspect. Cybercrime has surpassed illegal drug trafficking as a criminal moneymaker.* Every 3 seconds an identity is stolen.** Without security, your unprotected PC can become infected within four minutes of connecting to the internet.*** The Council of Europe's Cybercrime Treaty uses the term 'cybercrime' to refer to offenses ranging from criminal activity against data to content and copyright infringement [Krone, 2005]. However, others [Zeviar-Geese, 1997-98] suggest that the definition is broader, including activities such as fraud, unauthorized access, child pornography, and cyberstalking. The United Nations Manual on the Prevention and Control of Computer Related Crime includes fraud, forgery, and unauthorized access [United Nations, 1995] in its cybercrime definition. As you can see from these definitions, cybercrime can cover a very wide range of attacks. Understanding this wide variation in types of cybercrime is important as different types of cybercrime require different approaches to improving your computer safety. Symantec draws from the many definitions of cybercrime and defines it concisely as any crime that is committed using a computer or network, or hardware device. The computer or device may be the agent of the crime, the facilitator of the crime, or the target of the crime. The crime may take place on the computer alone or in addition to other locations. The broad range of cybercrime can be better understood by dividing it into two overall categories, defined for the purpose of this research as Type I and Type II cybercrime. Type I cybercrime has the following characteristics: It is generally a single event from the perspective of the victim. For example, the victim unknowingly downloads a Trojan horse which installs a keystroke logger on his or her machine. Alternatively, the victim might receive an e-mail containing what claims to be a link to known entity, but in reality is a link to a hostile website. It is often facilitated by crimeware programs such as keystroke loggers, viruses, rootkits or Trojan horses. Software flaws or vulnerabilities often provide the foothold for the attacker. For example, criminals controlling a website may take advantage of a vulnerability in a Web browser to place a Trojan horse on the victim's computer. Examples of this type of cybercrime include but are not limited to phishing, theft or manipulation of data or services via hacking or viruses, identity theft, and bank or e-commerce fraud. Type II cybercrime, at the other end of the spectrum, includes, but is not limited to activities such as cyberstalking and harassment, child predation, extortion, blackmail, stock market manipulation, complex corporate espionage, and planning or carrying out terrorist activities. The characteristics of Type II cybercrime are: It is generally an on-going series of events, involving repeated interactions with the target. For example, the target is contacted in a chat room by someone who, over time, attempts to establish a relationship. Eventually, the criminal exploits the relationship to commit a crime. Or, members of a terrorist cell or criminal organization may use hidden messages to communicate in a public forum to plan activities or discuss money laundering locations, for example. It is generally facilitated by programs that do not fit into under the classification crimeware. For example, conversations may take place using IM (instant messaging) clients or files may be transferred using FTP.
Posted: 25-12-2013 @ 11:44:58
Cyber crime encompasses any criminal act dealing with computers and networks (called hacking). Additionally, cyber crime also includes traditional crimes conducted through the Internet. For example; hate crimes, telemarketing and Internet fraud, identity theft, and credit card account thefts are considered to be cyber crimes when the illegal activities are committed through the use of a computer and the Internet.
Posted: 16-12-2013 @ 13:00:51
Cyber crime encompasses any criminal act dealing with computers and networks (called hacking). Additionally, cyber crime also includes traditional crimes conducted through the Internet. For example; hate crimes, telemarketing and Internet fraud, identity theft, and credit card account thefts are considered to be cyber crimes when the illegal activities are committed through the use of a computer and the Internet.
Posted: 16-12-2013 @ 13:00:39